Travel

Iran's undiscovered tourist spot: Hormuz

Iran's Hormuz Island is a geologist's paradise with ochre-stained streams, crimson-hued beaches, and fascinating salt caves

Umema Syed

Iran's undiscovered tourist spot: Hormuz

Iran's Hormuz Island is a geologist's paradise with ochre-stained streams, crimson-hued beaches, and fascinating salt caves

Irans undiscovered tourist spot: Hormuz
Iran's undiscovered tourist spot: Hormuz

Hormuz, a teardrop-shaped shimmering salt dome 8 kilometres (5.6 miles) off the Iranian coast in the murky blue waters of the Persian Gulf, is covered in layers of shale, clay, and iron-rich volcanic rocks that glow brilliantly in shades of red, yellow, and orange as a result of the more than 70 minerals that can be found there. Dr. Kathryn Goodenough, lead geologist of the British Geological Survey and a former Iranian employee, claims that the Persian Gulf's shorelines were covered in extensive salt layers hundreds of millions of years ago when shallow waters were there. The colourful landmass was created as a result of the strata' gradual contact and interlayering with nearby volcanic sediment rich in minerals.

Because of this geological structure, there are ochre-colored streams, crimson-hued beaches, and magnificent salt caves. 

Hormuz is actually frequently referred to as the "rainbow island" because to the variety of chromatic hues it emits. The only edible mountain in the world is also supposed to be located there.

On Hormuz, there are a lot of other attractions besides the ruby-red mountain. The stunning Goddess of Salt salt mountain is located in the western part of the island. The salt is thought to have healing properties that can absorb and expel any bad energy by the locals. Similar to this, the south-west of the island features Rainbow Valley, a breathtaking display of multicoloured mountains and soil in hues of red, purple, yellow, ochre, and blue. As you proceed, you will see geometric designs made of brightly coloured patches that shimmer and gleam when the sun shines on them.

Despite the island's fantastical, kaleidoscopic natural colours, few tourists are aware of it. According to the Ports and Maritime Organization of Iran, just 18,000 visitors came here in 2019. Locals are already supplying tourists with home-cooked meals and providing rickshaw and motorcycle transportation throughout the island.

For more Entertainment news, follow us on Google News and don’t miss out on the latest updates!

Latest News